Virginia DUI and Traffic Defense Blog

What Counts as Reckless Driving in Virginia?

Reckless driving is a traffic offense that refers to several traffic violations under Virginia State Law, with speeding being the most common violation. Any form of driving that may endanger life, limb, or property counts as committing reckless driving, and is considered a criminal offense according to traffic law. As

Effects on Insurance after DUI

DUI means driving under the influence or drunk driving. Drunk driving laws prohibit operating a motor vehicle: While impaired by drugs or alcohol With a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or higher With certain blood concentration of drugs such as cocaine, methamphetamine There is a “zero-tolerance” law in Virginia

Benefits of Driver Improvement Course for Traffic Violators

Being charged with major traffic violations such as reckless driving in Virginia can be less scary if you have an experienced traffic attorney. But did you know that it would also help to take a driver improvement course? If you have been charged for driving recklessly or for moving violations,

Drivers Involved in DUI Accident May Face Serious Charges in Virginia

Being arrested for driving under the influence or DUI, sometimes called driving while intoxicated or DWI, is a serious crime in Virginia. If you have been arrested for a first offense DUI, you may get away with just a misdemeanor charge. However, if you were involved in a vehicular accident

Traffic Violations in Virginia

Moving and Non-Moving Violations in Virginia Traffic tickets in Virginia are divided into two categories: moving and non-moving violations. Moving violations are those that are committed while the car is moving. This includes speeding and hit and run crimes. The punishment for this kind of violation is more severe because

How Much is the Jail Time for DUI in Virginia?

DUI is more mostly called drunk driving. However, in Virginia, the official term used is DWI (driving while intoxicated) and DUI (driving under the influence). Though these two are different, people use the two interchangeably when driving is involved with alcohol or drugs. Due to the many cases of alcohol or